Cognitive Therapy Mesa AZ

Types of cognitive therapy include rational-emotive therapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy. Cognitive therapy helps patients identify cognitive distortions that may be hindering them. It also helps people anticipate triggers of unwanted behaviors. Cognitive distortions include overgeneralizations and arbitrary inference. Cognitive therapy techniques can also help with weight loss, as it teaches dieters to identify beliefs that hinder their weight loss goals. Read on to learn more and to find therapists in Mesa, AZ that give access to cognitive therapy.

David C. Hubbard, Ph. D., P.L.C.
(480) 776-3386
1237 S Val Vista Dr
Mesa, AZ
Industry
Mental Health Professional, Psychologist

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General Wayne R PhD
(480) 844-0223
761 E University Dr Ste G
Mesa, AZ
Industry
Psychologist

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Nature's Sunshine Products Independent Distributor
(480) 892-2088
761 E University Dr
Mesa, AZ
Industry
Herbalist, Massage Practitioner, Psychologist

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Christiano Daniel J Phd
(480) 507-7880
4115 E Valley Auto Dr
Mesa, AZ
Industry
Psychologist

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Drydyk Steve Phd
(480) 632-5638
3651 E Baseline Rd Ste 111
Gilbert, AZ
Industry
Psychologist

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Hull Kathleen Fnp
(480) 844-0163
465 E Broadway Rd
Mesa, AZ
Industry
Psychologist, Registered Nurse

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Luminous Skin Care
(480) 985-4757
4554 E Inverness Ave
Mesa, AZ
Industry
Massage Practitioner, Physical Therapist, Psychologist

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Aztec Chiropractic Clinic
(480) 830-7300
1423 S Higley Rd
Mesa, AZ
Industry
Acupuncturist, Psychologist

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Gilmour Denise Mc
(480) 813-0367
3651 E Baseline Rd
Gilbert, AZ
Industry
Psychologist

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Thomas Kathy Phd
(480) 497-6447
1533 E Bruce Ave
Gilbert, AZ
Industry
Psychologist

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Cognitive Therapy

Cognitive Therapy

The obstacle to reaching your fitness goals could be all in your head.

If you’re one of those people who can walk by a candy dish without the urge to grab a handful, if you’ve never missed a Pilates class and if losing 5 pounds takes no more effort than the decision to do it, you can go ahead and skip this article. But for the rest of us, who have more than once lost the battle between willpower and temptation, a leading voice in Cognitive Therapy (CT), has some promising news: All we need to win the willpower war is already within us.

“The idea behind Cognitive Therapy is that it’s the way we look at situations that influences how we feel, what we do, and our physiological response more than situations themselves,” says Judith Beck, director of the Beck Institute for Cognitive Therapy in suburban Philadelphia and daughter of psychiatrist Aaron Beck, MD, who developed CT in the early ‘60s. The therapy, which revolutionized the way depression and other mental illness are treated, focuses on teaching people skills to anticipate and avoid or defuse situations that trigger unwanted behaviors. The elder Beck’s innovations had such a profound impact on the discipline of psychology that in 2006 he was awarded both the Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Medical Research and the Gustav O. Lienhard Award. The Beck Institute, founded in 1994, grew out of Aaron Beck’s Center for Cognitive therapy at the University of Pennsylvania, where Judith is clinical associate professor.

About 20 years ago, Judith Beck realized that the therapy, which had been so successful in treating mental illness, could also help people make their weight-loss goals stick. So she developed a program to teach groups of overweight people the cognitive, behavioral, motivational and problem-solving skills needed to succeed at dieting. The results have been impressive—program participants now only lose weight during the program, but after 18 months, they’re still losing weight. Even Judith, after years of dieting, lost 15 pounds using the system and has kept it off for 10 years.

The group weight loss program has been so successful that Beck compiled all the years of research, along with her and her father’s vast body of knowledge, into The Beck Diet Solution (Oxmoor House, April 2007). The book’s six-week plan works with any diet and promises to “train your brain to think like a thin person.” Each day, the reader masters a different skill or technique designed to change attitudes about food and exercise. The approach may seem slow to some, but it’s important to go day by day, according to Beck. “Sometimes we take on too much,” she says. “The big problem people have with dieting is they don’t realize there are skills they need to learn. They think they can just get the diet and follow it.”

In fact, success in dieting is all about building the proper skills like learning to tolerate hunger, recognizing and correcting thinking mistakes (see below) and pl...

Click here to read the rest of this article from HealingLifestyles.com

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